BLOG: Telling the real story of St. Peter’s

October 10, 2017 3:59 pm
    By: Sharon Pierson, VP Population Health and Community Medicine

 

St. Peter’s has a long and proud history of delivering care to our community, but we often find that people don’t know the breadth and complexity of the care we provide, or who we are providing it to. As we plan for the future of our programs housed at St. Peter’s, we need to tell our story, make sure people know what we actually do here, and share our ambitious vision for the future.

Our four programs – Restorative Care, Behavioural Health, Medically Complex and Palliative Care  – are all considered complex care. Complex care is just what it sounds like: multi-faceted, with patients that tend to have more than one medical issue. Though many people think we serve only older adults, in fact we have adults of all ages in each of the four programs.  With the exception of the Palliative program, we seek to move patients to a lower level of care in the community wherever possible once their treatment goals have been reached at St. Peter’s.

In our Restorative Care, Behavioural Health and Medically Complex programs, we’re seeing a distinct trend to patients being more acutely ill than in the past. Since we don’t have acute-care back-up at St. Peter’s, any patient needing an acute care procedure, such as replacing a feeding tube, means being temporarily transferred to another HHS site, with accompanying disruption for patients and families.

We know from our formal data collection and forecasting that this trend to sicker patients will continue. We also know that the aging demographic, and accompanying rise in chronic conditions, means our programs need to grow. While today we have 230 beds, we predict we’ll need 350 in 20 years, and our outpatient visits will grow from 10,000 to 14,500.

Our vision is to move our programs to the Juravinski Hospital site, where we can custom-design our space to suit patients’ needs and accommodate the necessary growth.

Unfortunately, our Maplewood site can’t accommodate this planned growth – we are tightly land-locked within a residential neighbourhood where building height and parking restrictions make new development virtually impossible. And even if we could rebuild here, we still wouldn’t have the adjacency to acute care. At this point we don’t know how the Maplewood site may be used once we move our programs out, although some interesting ideas are being floated for future discussion.

Our vision is to move our programs to the Juravinski Hospital site, where we can custom-design our space to suit patients’ needs and accommodate the necessary growth.  Our patients and their families will enjoy more privacy, more space and more amenities in rooms and common areas built to modern standards. Our staff will have the satisfaction of being able to deliver their wonderful care within an enhanced environment. And we’ll have the adjacency to acute care that many of our patients need.

This is the new St. Peter’s story; let’s work together to share it with our community.